When you drill a hole through material sized for the bolt, the head of the bolt will remain in place while you tighten the fastener onto the material.Using a hole too large for the bolt will result in the bolt head spinning in the material. Below the half-round head of a carriage bolt sits a squared shoulder. Place the washer on the rear side of the bolt followed by the nut. First you drill a hole into the wood for the appropriate size (diameter) of the bolt. In wood, tightening the nut pulls the shoulders of the square seat down into the wood and prevents the bolt from turning as you tighten. In metal applications this doesn't happen unless the metal is very thin and a carriage bolt will rotate with no way to put a wrench on it. Coat the drill bit with cutting fluid if you are drilling a hole into metal.Drill a hole through the material with the secured drill bit. This will not allow the carriage bolt to tighten in the material.Measure one side of a carriage bolt with a tape measure.Secure a drill bit matching the measurement of the carriage bolt into the chuck of a variable speed drill. Carriage bolts eliminate the need for two wrenches to tighten a connection. DO NOT TAKE THE NUT ALL THE WAY OFF THE BOLT, you will need it to help move the bolt along.Once the nut is backed off to the end of the bolt, hit the nut with a hammer. The hole will be only slightly narrower than the square neck underneath the head of the carriage bolt.Slip the carriage bolt through the bolt hole with the round head on the side where you drilled the recess hole. Select a lag bolt that's 1/4 inch shorter than the accumulated width of the two pieces. Once the underside of the head rests against the wood, the carriage bolt is officially installed.Removing the carriage bolt is a fairly simple process.

When you drill a hole through material sized for the bolt, the head of the bolt will remain in place while you tighten the fastener onto the material. Carriage bolts are designed with a domed head, which can prevent loosening from one side, an enlarged head shape also prevents the bolt from being pulled through a wooden construction.

The nails will fill the gaps between the hole and bolt to keep it from spinning. Slide a washer over the other end and thread a nut.Tighten the nut slowly with a wrench. The design of carriage bolts allows you to install the fastener without a helping hand. You just need to drill a hole the size of the bolt through the wood.

Thread a nut onto the end of the bolt. When you drill a hole through material sized for the bolt, the head of the bolt will remain in place while you tighten the fastener onto the material. These are only temporary jury-rigged solutions and should not be regarded as permanent.Don't use carriage bolts to join parts that are critical to the safety of a machine or structure while in use, unless that structure is designed to accept carriage bolts.Tom King published his first paid story in 1976. Since there is no drive device for the domed head of the bolt, this is the only way to install it.The installation process is fairly simple.

Allow the adhesive to dry and cure, then tighten the nut with a wrench.

This shoulder is designed to catch on wood and be pulled into it (by tightening the nut). Mark for two holes in the posts that are each 1 inch from opposite sides of the post and 1-1/2 inches from the top or bottom of the joist. This is typically done using carriage bolts, pictured above. Spin the nut clockwise to seat it against the washer.

Carriage bolts are made with a square seat beneath a round unslotted head. Docks: There are plenty of areas on a dock that will require the use of a carriage bolt. Pump the trigger of the drill bit to keep it spinning at a slower RPM when drilling through harder materials.Slide the threaded end of the carriage bolt into the drilled hole. The washer will help to distribute the force you are about to put onto the nut to pull the bolt into the wood. In metal applications this doesn't happen unless the metal is very thin and a carriage bolt will rotate with no way to put a wrench on it. The pressure of the nut as it tightens will pull the bolt down into the recess hole, pushing the metal edges out of shape as the corners of the bolt neck are drawn downward.

This will not only protect the wood on the back side but also keep the bolt from digging into it and getting stuck.As you tighten the nut, the square shoulder on the bolt will be pulled into the wood.

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We are working hard to deliver items in a timely manner. Made primarily for wood, carriage bolts have a square shoulder right below the head. The nylon insert is located in a tapered section located at the back of the nut. Below the half-round head of a carriage bolt sits a squared shoulder. In metal applications this doesn't happen unless the metal is very thin and a carriage bolt will rotate with no way to put a wrench on it. When joining pieces of wood together using a carriage bolt, the square head on the bolt can become stripped in the hole, making them hard to tighten. Using a hole too large for the bolt will result in the bolt head spinning in the material. Unless the metal is very hard, the square neck will draw down into the recess and create a square hole for itself that will prevent the bolt from turning when you tighten the nut.Replace the carriage bolt with a standard bolt as soon as possible.